The Alpilean Ice Hack for Weight Loss: Dietitian Review 

As a Registered Dietitian, I’ve heard of my fair share of weight loss hacks and quick fixes, so when I hear about a new trend, I’m always a little skeptical. Recently, the “Alpilean ice hack” has been making waves on social media, with promises of boosting metabolism and aiding in weight loss. 

But does it actually work? 

If you’re new around here, hi! My name is Jamie and I’m a Registered dietitian of nearly ten years.  In this blog post, I’ll dive into the science behind the ice hack and share my professional Alpilean Review. 

Ice cubes dropping into a glass of water in front of a black background

What is the ice hack for weight loss?

The Alpine ice hack is a relatively new weight loss strategy that involves drinking iced water to “rev up” your metabolism in combination with a supplement called Alpilean. You might also see it referred to as the “himalayan ice hack” or “alpine ice hack diet”.

This theory is that cold temperatures from the ice water, plus this special supplement, can boost metabolism and lead to weight loss. 

Right off the bat it sounds a bit too good to be true. Let’s see if we have any science, like any, on our side. 

What are the ingredients in Alpilean?

The Alpilean weight loss supplement contains a proprietary blend of several ingredients that are supposed to support weight loss. Let’s channel our inner Ms. Frizzle and explore if this alpilean supplement does anything (or not).

Golden Algae

Algae has been studied as a potential way to promote weight loss. Some research has shown that the active ingredient in golden algae – Fucoxanthin – may have a modest effect on weight by inhibiting the absorption of fat from your food (1). 

But keep in mind, most of these studies have been done in mice and rats, not in humans. Plus, there’s no long-term research. We need research on the human body.

Dika nut

The Dika tree is native to Africa and is sometimes called the “African mango seed” (2). Although the dika nut is purported as a weight loss aid, the research is extremely limited (3, 4). 

A study from 2022 compared folks taking a dika nut supplement or placebo for twelve weeks and found that “there were no differences between groups with respect to metabolism” (5). 

Drumstick tree leaf

The drumstick tree is one of several names for the Moringa oleifera tree, a plant from India that has many potential health benefits (6).

It may lower blood sugar and cholesterol, but it doesn’t have any research to support weight loss, as the manufacturers of the supplement claim (7). 

Bigarade orange

Bigarade orange, often referred to as bitter orange, is another supplement frequently promoted for weight loss. It contains synephrine, a compound similar to ephedrine, which was banned by the FDA due to safety concerns (8).

While some studies suggest that synephrine might increase metabolism and fat burning, other research points to potential health risks and side effects like high blood pressure and increased heart rate. 

Therefore, the use of bigarade orange for weight loss remains controversial, and it is not universally recommended. If you have medical conditions you definitely want to run this one by your doctor if you decide you’re going to take this supplement.

What’s not shocking is that the supplement is found to be effective, when combined with diet and exercise (eye roll, please) (9). 

Ginger rhizome

Ginger has been a part of traditional medicine for centuries and has gained popularity in the realm of weight management. Some research suggests that ginger could have thermogenic effects that might help boost your metabolism and fat-burning abilities while reducing feelings of hunger (10, 11). 

However, it’s essential to remember that consuming ginger alone will not result in dramatic weight loss. Any effective weight loss regimen must include a balanced diet and regular physical activity. So, while ginger can be part of a healthy diet, it should not be seen as a magic weight loss solution. 

Turmeric

Turmeric is another popular supplement that’s often touted for its potential health benefits, including weight loss. This golden spice contains curcumin, a compound purported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. 

Some research suggests that curcumin may aid in weight loss by reducing inflammation associated with obesity and by influencing the processes related to metabolism and fat storage (12).

However, it’s important to note that the studies are still preliminary, and more research is needed to fully understand the potential weight loss benefits of turmeric. 

Much like ginger, turmeric alone cannot replace a balanced diet and regular exercise. It’s also always advisable to consult a healthcare provider before beginning any new supplement regimen.

Remember, there is no magic pill for weight loss – it requires a comprehensive approach involving diet, exercise, and sometimes, lifestyle changes.

Supplement capsules on a white background with green leaves.

This is a proprietary blend

One super important thing to keep in mind is that these Alpilean weight loss pills are “proprietary blends” of these ingredients.

These blends are often listed on the product label, but they don’t provide the details of how much of each ingredient the product actually contains. And, as a Registered Dietitian, that can make it difficult to assess the effectiveness of the product. 

Without knowing the quantities of the active ingredients in the alpilean formula, it’s impossible to say if there’s enough of them to make a real difference, or if they’re even present in safe amounts. Yikes.

So, it’s always a good idea to approach supplements with proprietary blends with caution.

The Alpilean weight loss website is slimy

If you take a look at the official website for Alpilean, you’ll see red flag after red flag. 

“FDA Approved”

One of the first seals of approval at the top of the website is a claim that this product is FDA-approved. 

The Food and Drug Administration literally doesn’t approve supplements at all – this claim doesn’t exist (13). Major, major red flag.

“Lock in your desired weight”

In the FAQ section of their website, they recommend being able to “lock in” your desired weight, which is not a thing at all. Bodies change over time, this is normal biology, not something you can hack or “lock in” for later. 

“If you’re over 35 years old or carry excess weight, we recommend you take Alpilean for at least 3 to 6 months so it has enough time to work throughout your entire body to target your inner body temperature, reach your desired weight, and lock it in for years into the future.”

Where’s the research?

One of the biggest things that is missing from its website is any clinical research to show that this dietary supplement actually works for what they’re claiming.

The website links to a few research studies that may support the individual ingredients in the supplement, but because the pills are a proprietary blend, there’s no way to know if the amounts are enough to matter for you and your weight loss goals (or are in safe quantities).

And there’s nothing that proves that lowering your core body temperature with ice cold water is effective for long term, sustainable weight loss or improves your metabolic rate.

Plus, we don’t know if this product has been 3rd party verified for safety. I know we’ve talked about this on the blog before, but let’s do a quick review of what it means to be 3rd party verified. 

Always look for 3rd party certification 

In the world of dietary supplements, especially in the United States, third-party certification is crucial to ensure that you are buying safe and high-quality products.

This is because anyone, absolutely anyone, can make a supplement and sell it online. Isn’t that a little scary? You don’t have to be a medical professional or have any kind of expertise to sell supplements. 

A 3rd party certification independently verifies that the supplements have been manufactured according to strict safety, quality, and effectiveness standards. It confirms that the product contains what’s listed on the label and is free from harmful contaminants. 

Well-known certification organizations like NSF International, U.S. Pharmacopeia, or ConsumerLab provide seals of approval that can give consumers peace of mind when selecting supplements. 

However, it’s important to note that while third-party certification helps identify reputable products, it doesn’t guarantee their effectiveness, i.e., just because the products in a bottle match what is on the label and are not contaminated, does not mean that they actually work.

Even so, third party testing is essential in a supplement, and this one doesn’t appear to have it.

A person stepping onto a white scale.

That’s a wrap

As a dietitian, I always caution against relying on quick fixes, fad diets and weight loss supplements when you’re on a weight loss journey. That 1000% includes these alipilean diet pills.

Not only are the alpilean ingredients questionable in terms of safety, but we have no idea how much of each ingredient is in the supplement.

Sorry, but lowering your internal body temperature and taking a weird supplement is not the answer.

Sustainable, long-term weight loss requires a lifestyle change and a commitment to healthy habits.

While the ice hack may provide some small benefits, it’s important to not rely on it as a sole solution to weight loss or a shortcut to a healthy lifestyle.

The key to success for overall health lies in the consistent implementation of healthy lifestyle strategies over time.

The best things you can do include proper nutrition, adequate sleep, regular physical activity, learning healthier ways of dealing with stress, connecting with others, and setting realistic goals while also finding pleasure in life. 

You don’t need strict diets or funky supplements to be your healthiest or reach your healthiest weight.

If you are looking for support in implementing healthy lifestyle changes without sacrificing balance and enjoyment within your day-to-day life, consider purchasing your own copy of the Balanced Basics Handbook. This user-friendly guide will provide you with all the detailed information you need to get started!

More hot supplements

It seems that we’ll never be done with products that make wild claims…without the data to back them up. 

I’m here to help you steer clear of misinformation. I’ve come across so many different products online, and I’ve got a few more recent reviews to share with you. Take a look:

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It's me, Jamie!

I’m a Registered Dietitian dedicated to helping you break free of the all-or-nothing dieting with balanced and realistic healthy eating.

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Meet Jamie

I’m a Registered Dietitian and I’ve been exactly where you are, right now. The all or nothing dieting, the constant food guilt, the scale obsession, absolutely no balance with food…. Sound familiar?